Strategic. Streamlined. Sexy : Keys to Success in Social Media

Planning a Social Media Strategy is about as straight forward as asking a toddler to “sit still for a minute”.  So what is a Marketing Director, Community Manager, accidental social media poster by default to do?

Social Media has morphed many skill-sets together and may be managed by a variety of different people or positions within an organization. Ideally an outside agency or consultant with experience in developing and executing multi-platform social communities and campaigns should be brought in to set up a social strategy, define key metrics for performance, and to train internal teams to manage moving forward.

Having said that, if time and resources are not available – stick with the three S’s in managing successful social media communities and campaigns – and make sure to integrate your social media with your overall marketing efforts, and you will see results and ROI.

 

Strategic, Streamlined and Sexy:

1. Strategic

Strong brands in social media have a strategy, the right resources, and a plan.  Start with what channels you need to build a presence on based on your target audiences.

Define social media goals.  Don’t jump in on every social media channel until you are doing one really well.  Maybe you have a killer Facebook business page, but you are lacking new fans, engagement or clicks back to a conversion.

Perhaps you have not had the time or resources in moving ahead with LinkedIn for your Sales team, but you know the networking tool could really make the sales process easier.  Build it into your plan and have a solid strategy to ensure that any time and money spent will see an ROI in some way or another.

Write a plan for each social channel you are already using or think your brand needs to have a presence on, and identify what needs to be improved and why.

If you spend time posting and building a community on Twitter and you can’t define a few good reasons why.

That question of ROI will always rear its ugly head.  Key performance metrics can be as simple as driving target referral traffic back to a website, or networking with customers and learning about the competitor.

Define what you (or your competitors) are doing well, how could it be improved, and how you will benchmark the performance or ROI.  Then map out what resources are in place to manage the community, the goals for each community, and how you will measure it.  

Think traffic to a website, increased engagement metrics, increases in content shares and viral distribution of your brand content.

 

 “Planning a social media strategy is as straight forward as asking a toddler to sit still for a minute.”

2. Streamlined

No one marketing campaign has ever worked in isolation.  At the same time, each of your social communities will be different in the way you deliver content, respond and engage with your followers and brand champions, and in the amount of time and resources you devote to it.

Be smart and streamlined with your messages.  If you are looking to run a contest on Facebook – ensure you plan it out properly, and ensure all roads lead to a point of conversion.  Conversion may be more “likers” or traffic to your website, but ensure that your target audience follows a path to enter the contest and complete an action that you had intend them to complete.

Be streamlined in your efforts overall.  Avoid trying too many tactics on too many social channels.  Stick with what’s working and make sure you manage your resources to be able to build your social brand over the long term.

 

“You have to stand out, shout out, and be proud of your brand on the social web!” 

3. Sexy

Yes I said sexy.  Digital media allows us to think outside the box.  Try some unique and creative tactics and have fun with it!  If you are going to dedicate time and resources to develop a presence on social communities – you better use them to their fullest potential!

Learn to listen and respond instead of pushing out messages to your target audiences. The social web is the place to show the personality of your brand and really engage your consumers – not to announce a 20% off special.

There are many other MUST DO’s in building out your brand social media strategy, but if you keep these points in mind, focus on good design and content, and at the very least commit to allocating resources to get in the game – you will be ready for all of those RT’s, LIKES, Diggs, G+’s, Shares, Comments and Views.

 

ABOUT:

Alicia Whalen is a Digital + Social Media Marketing Professional and recovering Entrepreneur, who has spent over a decade helping professionals understand how to embrace digital and social media. An avid tweeter and lover of travel, technology and the Ah-Ha moments.

Connect with Alicia on TwitterLinkedIn or at www.ideahatching.com

social media strategist vs social media enthusiast

I am an enthusiast of many things. Although I can appreciate a fine wine, and perhaps even describe the ‘nose’ of a good chardonnay – I dare say that I could lead a wine tasting session, or describe the process of oak aging or barrel fermenting.

I would say however that I am both an “enthusiast” and a “strategist” of Social Media. (and perhaps an evangelist and even a connoisseur of a good tweet).

Social media is as most would agree the new ‘medium’ in digital marketing. There are many out there trying to decipher how to…how much…and where to start in creating a social media “strategy” to attract a target consumer to engage and transact.

There lies the difference between a social media ‘Enthusiast” and a social media “Strategist” – it’s in the strategy (not just in the enthusiasm!) Wow – so that’s not rocket science!

Allow me to explain.

We must begin with what constitutes a good Social Media strategy.

1. Develop a good plan.
Sounds simple enough right? Start with who you are trying to reach and what social media channels they are likely frequenting. Decide what you are trying to achieve (ie. traffic back to a website, building an email database, an increase in brand awareness etc), chose the correct channels to populate (Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, LinkedIn, Flickr or all of the above), populate with content and build a community of followers.

Once you have decided on what social channels to include in your campaign, develop a plan to build a community – with an editorial or content strategy to support your goals.

For example: If you are primarily going to use viral video’s with the goal of driving traffic to a transaction – make sure that the YouTube channel you create has many points of reference and links back to your website.

Make sure that you have optimized your video’s properly to be found in search engines – and have populated other places with the video (like your website and Facebook page) and that you have added social media sharing tools to encourage more pass along distribution.

Also – ensure that all of your campaign elements are integrated and talk to each other.

2. Ensure that you have enough of a budget and resources (time, expertise, dollars) to not only plan, but execute the strategy.

This is the tricky part. How do I know what resources I will need after the campaign ‘shelf life’ is up?

Social Media channels like a Twitter account for example typically do not exist in isolation. Typically, a Tweeter is representing a brand voice, or has a Blog associated with it – or a transactional website in which to drive traffic to.

If you are going to engage in social media marketing, you should plan for it to be part of your long term marketing strategy.

4. Measure and assign key performance measurables

Use social monitoring tools (there are many) as well as website tracking tools like Google Analytics to see how the campaign has impacted your campaign goals. Is Facebook now a top referrer of traffic to your website after launching an aggressive Facebook brand page?

How has the time and resources spent on Twitter affected the traffic increases in traffic to your company Blog?

5. Learn and Continue Building
This is a key point as many social media ‘enthusiasts’ may not pay enough attention to the fact that the foundation built in the beginning stages has a big impact on future social media successes. An isolated brand Twitter page with no integration into any other parts of a company’s marketing mix – no matter how many followers it has – will not result in long term success.

In addition, those who live in the social communities such as Facebook, Twiiter and beyond expect transparency, commitment, and for you to add value to the social media ecosystem.

A one off viral video campaign will most likely not work to create any spectacular results without a long-term plan about how to leverage the traffic it has generated, or to engage that audience enough to act.

Social media enthusiasts are passionate about what social media can do – and they make excellent community manager’s and community developers. Just because an enthusiast has a large list of followers on Twitter does not necessarily mean that they can map out a good long-term strategy and help guide the set up and execution of a successful social media marketing campaign.

Always engage with a true Social Media Strategist – one that has proven case studies and speaks to the points above if you are looking for a long term or even short term results…it will pay off in achieving brand ‘mavens’ and not just ‘followers’ who you may never see again.

If you are a connoisseur of a good discussion about social media marketing…I invite you to RT (Re-Tweet) this blog post and share your idea’s of what it takes to be a true strategist.

Toronto, Ontario, Canada
alicia.whalen@gmail.com
905-401-2249

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